Why this election didn’t surprise me

Yelling about candidates isn’t going to change them, ever. And it isn’t going to change you.

We did it guys, we made it through the 2016 presidential election sponsored by Bravo! and E!

While many spent the past 18 months fuming, afraid and at a loss for words, I remained chill.

I didn’t bother debating with candidates supporters. I didn’t bother pretending to be shocked at the release of more offensive Trump commentary late in the election. I didn’t bother to be wary of another investigation into Clinton’s e-mails right before voting day. I didn’t bother feeling betrayed by the DNC when it showed that they weren’t ever with him, but always with her. Why? Because I know better.

I know the government is a dark, twisted, violent institution that has been allowing bad behavior to happen for decades. Yes, House of Cards is fiction, but do you really think that show ISN’T based off of true events, people & secrets?

The difference between this election and the ones before it, is that private information is not being written out by hand, sealed into a file and locked away behind 5 different combinations. Nope. It is being store in electronic files in electronic lockers that seem to be safe. Until they’re hacked. Then the dirty laundry is all out on the lawn for all the neighborhood to see.

This election was ugly. Not just from a physical standpoint, but also because the popular majority finally saw how their disinterest & inaction had provided them lackluster options. And instead of taking accountability for that, society tends to place the blame on the party. Haven’t you realized, society, that pointing your fingers at the party members doesn’t cause them to act? Do you know what causes them to act? Money, which you don’t have enough of to influence them to behave in your interest!

So, what’s next for us normal folk? Well, maybe y’all can read the media instead of blaming it, and I mean MULTIPLE media outlets, not just one. And maybe you can elect party members in your local and state elections that are worthy of your vote & can be developed into better governmental options for the future. And maybe you can stop using the internet in finding memes to complain about so and so candidate, and actually use it to research important issues about your communities.

Pshhh, what am I thinking? Americans talk first, think second. It would be too much of me to ask my fellow voters to actually advocate for themselves for once, wouldn’t it?

Why I’m Losing ‘Hope’ in Women’s Soccer

I wrote this blog last year about Hope Solo. For those of you who know me, I have been an “anti-fan” of Solo’s for years…actually over a decade now. This blog post explains where it stems from, but I do want to add, that I am so incredibly disappointed with how our society has continued to ignore the red flags and warning signs this woman has displayed time and time again, all in the name to either move the cause of women’s sports further, or help the team “win.” Teams win games, not individuals. This isn’t golf. This isn’t tennis. This is soccer, a team sport. So, seriously, US Soccer, WNT, why have you let Hope behave so badly these past 15+ years? Was it because there weren’t policies in place to handle the offenses she was committing? Was it because she was friends with the higher ups? Was it because you felt sorry for her? Was it because you couldn’t see that there are THOUSANDS of girls across the country that are training every day to earn a spot like hers one day, and hell, there are probably at least 20 that could take it from her not only by their skill but also by their character. No, Hope. I don’t need to hear your rebuttals or your comments. What I want to hear, as a former soccer player, a former goalkeeper, a former female athlete, and a current fan, WHY this got to play out so long?

The Bite Me Chronicles

I started in competitive soccer when I was 6 years old and played until I was about 17, “retiring” after having two knee surgeries and countless broken bones.

I’ve been a loyal US soccer fan since I started kicking the ball, wearing a Mia Hamm number nine jersey when the ’99 team won against China. Attending dozens of Chicago Fire soccer games at Soldier Field, North Central College stadium during the construction of their new stadium, and finally, at Toyota Field. I was lucky enough to attend the 2003 Women’s World Cup in California, watching some of the greats play their last matches.

After the 2003 World Cup, a new set of legs hit the pitch in 2007. I was sad to see that eras were ending, especially some of my favorite players, but excited to get to know these new ladies.

Abby Wambach made herself known to the world, scoring…

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Why I’m Losing ‘Hope’ in Women’s Soccer

I started in competitive soccer when I was 6 years old and played until I was about 17, “retiring” after having two knee surgeries and countless broken bones.

I’ve been a loyal US soccer fan since I started kicking the ball, wearing a Mia Hamm number nine jersey when the ’99 team won against China. Attending dozens of Chicago Fire soccer games at Soldier Field, North Central College stadium during the construction of their new stadium, and finally, at Toyota Field. I was lucky enough to attend the 2003 Women’s World Cup in California, watching some of the greats play their last matches.

After the 2003 World Cup, a new set of legs hit the pitch in 2007. I was sad to see that eras were ending, especially some of my favorite players, but excited to get to know these new ladies.

Abby Wambach made herself known to the world, scoring 6 goals in the tournament, and Heather O’Reilly showed that she was a danger, flying down the flanks of the field & setting up beautiful plays. Then, there was Hope Solo.

I hold a soft spot for goalkeeper Briana Scurry in my heart. She was fearless. She was strong. She was a leader. She was a teammate. Scurry took a back seat to Solo in the first few matches of the ’07 Cup. Then, in the semifinal game against Brazil, the lineup was changed. Solo was out, Scurry was in.

To put it briefly: the entire team left their “A-game” in the locker room, as well as Shannon Boxx, who was ejected after two yellow cards in the first half, and the Americans fell to Brazilians 4-0.

The press rushed the field, surrounding the team for comments…and Solo didn’t hold back.

It was at this moment that any budding affection I had for her, died. This is also the first, public moment that we see who Solo really is – selfish, arrogant, a self-proclaimed victim. She blasted the coaches’ decision, Scurry’s performance, and declared if she were in the net, then the red, white, and blue would be the victors, not gold and green.

There was fallout. Solo was pulled from the third place game against Norway by the entire team, and they would go on to win 4-1.

Solo would eventually make her way back into the ladies’ good graces, and stay quiet…for a little bit.

Solo comes from a rough, unstable family background. Perhaps that is why she has a sour attitude. Or why she goes on the attack when she feels like her job is in jeopardy – it’s the only good thing in her life.

But, that doesn’t excuse what she has (allegedly) done – to her teammates, to her family and to the little girls looking up to the team, all over the country.

This woman has gotten so many chances, so many outs, so many excuses to justify her bad behavior. Whether it’s trash talking a teammate, excessive drinking, or inflecting physical/mental/emotional pain on others her stellar performance on the field is what excuses her from retribution.

By allowing this woman to represent her country, the organization is telling young girls that being a talented performer will help bad behavior “blow over” because your talents are more important than your character.

To me, winning is not more important than the team’s mental health, and getting Solo the break she not only deserves but needs from the game to help her improve her heart & soul.

The past year’s NFL scandals inspired discussions for weeks about holding players accountable for indecent acts that don’t even necessarily occur on the field. So why aren’t we holding Solo as accountable? Is it because she’s a woman? Is it because she’s so well regarded her in sport? Is it because if we punish her, the hope for the growth of soccer in America will be stunted?

I know at least for me, Hope Solo is not the answer to women’s soccer and its growth in America…Hope is the sport’s despair.